history
Edgar Allan Poe 1809-1849

We hear the word “reform” on a regular basis today. We frequently hear everything needs reform, from political to social issues, all the way to global problems. One of the most important areas needing reform today is that of simple history.

Why history? For the simple fact, any researcher who delves into yesteryear’s newspapers, magazines, and texts observes something fascinating. Actual history is virtually unknown. Our lives have been so thoroughly drenched with folklore and fakelore, permeated with tall tales and half-truths, that what we see today is a poorly created copy of what actually was.

Some parts are legible, or truthful. Some areas are faded, or difficult to understand. Oftentimes it seems facts have been deliberately obscured in favor of a modern writer’s arbitrary whims. If we look at contemporary history books, we also see most are authored with personal opinions in mind, and only information that supports those opinions is utilized. Most source or cite other modern works, which cite other modern works, and the pattern repeats with each new volume. The exact same information is repeated with a different layout, or different wording.

One classic example of history’s error relates to the literary genius, Edgar Allan Poe. Today, most readers are given the impression that Poe was a drug-addicted, mad genius. He was an atheist, a dark and morbid individual, a tortured soul who married his cousin. Some sources even suggest he was responsible for the murder of the cigar-shop girl, from the Mystery of Marie Roget. He overdosed and died in 1849. Poe’s decades-long hatred of Longfellow was just a ruse and he admitted he enjoyed the poet before his death.

In reality, Poe lived in abject poverty most of his adult life. He had perpetual financial problems and certainly had no funds to waste on addiction of any kind. His stepmother ensured he had no assistance from his wealthy, adoptive father. Some plausible sources suggest he had issues with alcohol, simply because his biological father was an alcoholic. There is no actual proof he abused substances of any kind.

Poe lived with his two aunts most of his adult life. He was not an atheist, deist, or Gnostic. He was a Christian who carried a bible, although it is not known if he belonged to a denomination. He played cards weekly with a group of Jesuit priests. He was a bright child who was at the top of his class in studies and athletics, a champion swimmer. He was adopted at 3, so technically he had no biological cousin. He never regarded his wife as a child.

Teenage marriage was common in the 1820s and 1830s because the average lifespan, until after the Civil War, was around 40 years. Virginia, his wife, was a prodigy pianist and Poe adored music. It is truthful to say that every female Poe loved died in his arms, from his mother to his wife. His death remains a mystery and many believe he was poisoned by voting officials.

Poe hated Longfellow. Period. He felt the Longfellow was overrated, over hyped, and overpaid. He also made public accusations that Longfellow was a plagiarist. Longfellow was the literary darling during Poe’s lifetime. Another fact is Poe never apologized for his critiques. A related excerpt is featured below.

There is a striking difference between the two versions when compared. What happened to Poe? Serious fans usually think of one word: Longfellow.

Fans of Longfellow hated Poe and they hated his criticism even more. As soon as he died, many of Longfellow’s friends stretched the truth regarding Poe and his life. What were the worst accusations during the Victorian Age? Substance abuse (opium/laudanum addiction, alcoholism, etc.). Perversity (he married a child cousin, pedophilia and inbreeding). Disbelief in Christianity (atheist, deist, or Gnostic). It’s ironic that everything so loathed in that era magically became attributed to Poe after his death.

It’s a classic example of how history has been rewritten and altered to suit the whims of new generations, but it does a tremendous disservice. It also turns fascinating historic characters into caricatures, reduced to one-sided stereotypes. If we want to make history a fascinating subject, which it very well is, we should do so with openness and honesty. Even the History Channel has ignored fact and truth in favor of sensation and stereotypes among many of their historic dramas. What hope does the rest of society have in preserving history, as it deserves?

Miscellany:

*Pecos Bill and Paul Bunyan never existed, nor any individuals like them. Both were marketing inventions from the Twentieth Century.

* Marie-Antoinette never said, “Let them eat cake.” That was likely invented by French Revolution sympathizers. In reality, Marie was terrified for her two children, and rightly so. Both died around the time of her execution.

* The Civil War wasn’t the “Civil War” until the 1910s. Before that, it was most commonly called “The Great Rebellion,” because the Confederacy rebelled by seceding from the Union.

 

Poe’s Charge of Longfellow’s Plagiarism:

 

 

21 thoughts on “A Campaign for History Reform”

    1. TY, Mark. I’ve been studying Poe about 20 years. It’s so sad, really. Those things would have been the worst insults imaginable during his life and today, they’re thrown around like they’re the truth. Have you seen John Cusack’s “The Raven?” It’s a movie with Poe in the lead. I LOVED his behavior towards Longfellow. It’s a creative account of Poe’s last days, but it fairly well done.

      1. Hi Laura,

        Marriage and/or sexual engagement involving teenaged individuals and those older were permitted and considered acceptable (as you said above). In fact, intimate involvement between teenagers and older individuals is not pedophilic nor ever has been; they are two different animals. Pedophilia refers to an adult’s ongoing sexual interest in PREPUBESCENT children only; attraction to teenagers or adolescents, though criminal if acted on, is considered normal and has been all through history. Please take a look:

        AskDefinitions
        Psychology Today
        Richard Green, PhD
        Karen Franklin, PhD
        <a href="http://www.karenfranklin.com/resources/hebephilia-2/&quot;?Other Prominent Psychiatrists

        Only recently have the terms ‘teenager’ and ‘pedophile’ been erroneously perceived as synonymous in the minds of the public.This is why there is so much confusion and why a relationship between adults and adolescents in past centuries would be considered negative or problematic to those who live today. Chances are likely Poe’s relationship with his teenaged cousin at the time would have been deemed troublesome only because of his familial relationship with the young lady, not necessarily her age.

        In fact, by considering this actuality, anyone conducting an analysis through historical research would discern that such a claim (that he was a pedophile) had to be false, since the inference suggested is incorrect. I know you didn’t make this conclusion, but I thought I’d clarify it anyway.

        The term ‘pedophile,’ by the way, came about only recently in the psychiatric and psychological communities of the early-twentieth century to classify a particular adult sexual preference (i.e. prepubescent-pre-adolescent youths), so I doubt anyone would have used that term during Poe’s time.

        I know what you mean, though. As you have said, it would be conceivable that Poe’s detractors stirred up a scandal to ruin his reputation, by pointing out his questionable relation with his cousin. The same goes with the drug and alcohol addictions inaccurately applied to his history

        Also consider that such relationships existed during the twentieth century as well. Elvis married a 14-year-old girl and Jerry Lee Lewis did the same with a 13-year-old. Both adolescents, and neither man, as far as I know, was a pedophile. Such relationships are permitted in most of Europe and parts of S.A. as well.

        Oh, sorry for rambling on. I got a bit caught up in it. In any case, public distinctions are indigenous to time periods as well.

        As for the movie, yes, I saw it recently and I liked it. I thought he did a fine job, although I would have predicted someone like Johnny Depp in the role. He would have done an interesting job as well.

        You said it was fairly well done. The word “fairly” denotes you weren’t totally accepting of it. What are your thoughts on it? What did you fine favorable and unfavorable about it?.

        * Note: I hope the HTML works for my links. If not, my apologies. Can you adjust them if they do not go through for some reason? Some Blog forums do not accommodate HTML or hyperlink activation. Thanks.

        1. Hi, Mark! Thanks for that. Although, we’ll probably just have to disagree on a few points. I always regarded Elvis and Lewis as having some mental issues for marrying such young girls. I know it was common in history, but they were primitive peoples. We should be beyond all of it in developed areas. I do regard the “Barely Legal” stuff as pedophilia, that’s just me. It may not be the textbook definition, but that’s how I feel. As life spans have increased, sexual interests and habits should also have matured. They haven’t. I think that’s a concern and says a lot about the potential for society to socially regress.

          Marrying before an acceptable age, such as 16 or 18, would’ve been improper in Victorian literary society. Not so much the actual population because the literate public was far from being the general public back then. I guess I could see it more when lifespans were so short, the populations were so small, you had to take what you could get with relationships, and if you lost a parent or parents, marrying a stable older man was the only good prospect you had. We should be beyond that. One of the main reasons so many women died in childbirth was starting way too young. The female body isn’t actually ready for reproduction until years after puberty begins and the average for that doesn’t even start until around 13. It’s possible to have a child as a child, of course, and many did have children very young, but fatalities were common for it. Teen pregnancies are usually regarded as high risk.

          I think Cusack did as well as anyone could in such a role. I’m nitpicky when it comes to Poe. I started reading about him as a teen and felt I could relate so well to his life. I don’t think Poe drank as much as the character in the movie and I don’t think he would’ve dared be so forward with a woman he hadn’t married. I know they did it to establish a relationship between the two, but it was the Victorian Era. He didn’t have a pet raccoon or dissect in his spare time. Just things like that, they’re pretty minor. I’ve already watched it twice, I believe, so they’re not major issues. I absolutely LOVE when he starts screaming “LONGFELLOW!”

          1. Hi Laura,

            I’m sorry. I didn’t mean to offend you. I know this is a sensitive topic for some, and so I try to proceed carefully. I wasn’t sure if you had been aware of the distinction regarding pedophilia, which is why I provided the links. I just didn’t want you to think that my comments went unfounded. As a fellow researcher who thrives on reputable sources, you’d appreciate that.

            And, yes, I am fine with disagreeing. I would be diluted if I thought otherwise. No worries.

            As for my rationale, I draw most of it on what the experts say. The psychiatric community does not consider such attraction on the part of the elder to be pathological, so I figure there must be a reason. Most psychiatrists agree that most if not all men are psychologically “wired” and therefore drawn to young fertility. Adolescence is the period during which fertility peaks and so men seek it out, whether consciously or unconsciously. Still, I realize there are many other important factors involved, including those you have mentioned in your last response, along with disparity in life experience, emotional maturity and the legal mandates. I never condone such behavior, but I do understand and respect5 the distinctions between views.

            Just briefly explaining and clarifying my stance here.

            That said, I won’t push it, as I do respect your rationale and even agree with many points you have made, such as the high fatality rate due to birthing too young and the social needs required by an earlier lifespan. I am familiar with these historical aspects on the subject, so we are on the same page.

            As time progresses, so does (or should) humanity’s social conscience and maturity. Some aspects develop slower than others, some not at all.The primal need to kill other humans, as in the case of war, seems to fall under the latter category.

            As you nitpick with Poe, so do I with the Titanic. Whenever a watch any of the seven movies on the tragedies, I analyze the narrative for inconsistencies to fact. Some are outright, others more subtle, but I notice them just the same. I have been drawn to Titanic since I was a boy, so I have had a long time studies the nuances involved and conducted my own research (and continue to do so). In any case, I understand very well how you feel about that. As an artist, I also value the need to be creative as well, so I appreciate artistic liberty.

            Yes, the “LONGFELLOW” scream was quite penetrating. I could feel it all the way through.

            By the way, on which sources have you drawn regarding Poe’s real life? I would be interested in looking into the subject further.

            Sorry for the deviation. I’ll try to stay on the subject of the post.

          2. Hi! Sorry this is late, I had to help my mother to the ER yesterday. No, I wasn’t offended. I’ve participated in political debates online for some time, so I have no issue with conflicting or just different perspectives. I think it’s beneficial to encounter differing opinions or perspectives. I know there are a number of arguments for a whole spectrum of possibilities and potentials. I’m very simplistic in my opinion and I do appreciate your information. I see teens as children, which they are. We know that in today’s world. We know they’re often incapable of responsible, rational decisions. They’re still in school, can’t make major purchases without their parents, or anything like that. I know there are many horrible decisions I could’ve made in my teens, without even considering any consequences. And I have no issue with someone who’s 70 marrying someone who’s 30, if they’re both happy, but they’re both adults.

            I also see humans as monogamist creatures, which is also against much of what is accepted today. I think if humans were meant to have many partners, there would be no STDs, as in the animal world. There are also links between promiscuity and infertility and cancer (for both male ad female), and animals don’t have such afflictions. I grew up (and still live) in the rural Blue Ridge Mountains, so I’m around far more animals than people…lol. You’ve probably guessed I can relate more to animals than I can people. Of course there are distinctions and I do value humanity more, but oftentimes I think humanity could learn a lot from them.

            I think we’ll always have wars to some extent. If they’re not physical battles, they’ll be “Cold Wars.” Humans are not known to coexist for any real length of time, without some jerk doing something. Someone always wants something and they’ll do what it takes to get it, and sometimes people like that lead nations.

            I love Titanic lore. Actually, I planned to make a section under the “Special Research Library,” for all the paranormal and supernatural legends connected to it. Like the Priestess Amen-Ra, the premonitions, the ghosts that came home, etc.

            I have many books and newspapers for Poe. You can find newspapers at the National Archives, such as where the actual Mr. Clem is interviewed. I prefer the older books on Poe, except “The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (with selections from his critical writings).” That was my first one. I got it when I was 16. It was published by Dorset in 1989. The introduction and notes are by Arthur Hobson Quinn. It’s massive. It’s just hard to find anything that makes him a real person. So many newer books make him a Victorian Goth or some kind of wizard from 1969 or something. I think the writers from the late 1800s and early 1900s really portrayed him as a normal person, rather than someone from the Munsters or the Addams family.

            Don’t worry about going off-topic. Discussion threads usually do, but that’s the interesting thing about it. You never know where it will end.

          3. That should be THEIR stance, not mine. Sorry. My view is a bit more varied than that and involves a multitude of other factors and considerations..

            Sorry, too, for missing some errors the require editing. It’s late here and I am trying to finish up for the night.

            As for the premise of your post, I agree–we need to be careful about what we adopt as “fact”. Research of any kind should be done responsibly and thoroughly, otherwise history will be lost.

          4. Hi Laura,

            Sorry for not getting back to you sooner. i got caught up. Apparently, I cannot reply to your most recent response, so U have to do it here. I hope it doesn’t cause any confusion.

            I am open to other perspectives as well. Each one offers some insight that adds to the greater whole, so all are valuable.

            If I am going to continue in the conversation, I want to make sure it’s understood that my comments should not be construed as an attempt to sway you from your beliefs. I respect the differences. Like you, I am merely sharing insight.

            As for teens, yes, they are not adults yet. That point is never disputed. The age of consent exists for a reason, and I am all for the reasons for it. As for science and nature in general, attraction is based on appearance, which alludes to the physical development. When you see a man and are drawn to him, is it his maturity level or his experiences in life? For most people, that answer would be “no.” That is the way it goes for men and young fertility–they are drawn by the developing body. According to science, once a youth passes into puberty, begins to physically and sexually develop and is able to conceive, she/he is no longer a child–biologically speaking. This is at the crux of sexual attraction. That doesn’t negate the point regarding mental development and/or emotional maturity, both of which are significant to the issue at hand. When it comes to coupling, the mind is just as important as the body, but primary attraction regards the physical and sexual development. That’s natural. This is why man’s attraction is not considered aberrant, although ACTING on that attraction is or can be subject to criminal prosecution, depending on the laws of where one lives.

            By the way, have you had a chance to visit any of those links above? I was curious about your impression. I know they wouldn’t change your view on the subject, but I figured you’d have some thoughts on them.

            As for monogamy, that’s interesting. People have asked why members of a couple (usually men) tend to stray. Science tends to take the view that men do this because they are wired by nature to spread their seeds to propagate, although research shows many other reasons as well, such as the changing of personality and personal values. This would certain seem to contradict a monogamous nature. Of course, both men and women usually stick with one person at a time; they ultimately seek out and desire only one mate.

            Yes, I love animals, too. I think I feel more comfortable with them than I do other humans, LOL.It’s ironic, isn’t it–humans are the prey over other species, and yet they tend to behave more minimalistic than the latter. We learn from animals every single day. The valuable lessons either are missed are take longer to sink in. That is likely to the human ego more than anything else.

            Ah, the National Archives. Yes, you mentioned that. I will certainly look into that. I appreciate the older works as well, mainly because they are less likely to propagate the stories about his life and deal with the man who actually was. I have a few sources, but I am always searching for extensive material. Perhaps modern views of horror have painted him in unexpected but understandable ways. This is one reason why sources written closer to the man’s life are likely to be more accurate. Still, be careful of those writings by Poe contemporaries who sought to slander or libel him. It’s important to know who they are for this reason.

            By the way, Laura, have you ever seen any of those old Vincent Price movie adaptations of EAP’s works? I have a few on DVD. These versions are not exact impressions of the written stories, but they are interesting. What are your thoughts on them?

            You like Titanic as well/ It’s a fascinating subject, and I never tire from learning about it, especially since there are always questions to be answered. It’s a vast and ongoing world. As for the ghostly lore, that, too, adds to the mystique. One place you can search is a site containing everything about Titanic and other ships. Experts and laypeople alike interact there: http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.orh . I spent a lot of time there. You can also try the website for the THS (Titanic Historical Society). Both are serious, respectable and quite impressive. There are a couple others, too.

            As for adding Titanic lore to ‘Appalachia,’ that sounds like a great idea. I just may have found my article topic. Perhaps I can include a series. There is so much information. I can balance the paranormal with the facts of the story. After all, I am very well-versed on the subject. Take a gander at my posts at http://researcherone.wordpress.com I have a couple of extensive articles there. Let me know what you think.

            Veering off track is called “drifting,” and yes, it is quite common on Internet forums. That adds the spice to the conversations. I just didn’t want to lose focus. .

          5. Hi! No, I’ve not had a chance to visit the links, but am hoping to asap. Actually, I think I encounter more who scoff at the notion of monogamy than anything, well, just speaking of people in general. Of course my family shares my opinion. I think the permissive nature comes from a culture that often regards dysfunction as something positive, or something to be encouraged. Like a man leading a string of women along. Some in science would justify it or rationalize it as a biological imperative or something else, rather than consider the manipulative or deceptive behavior behind it all. I’ve seen people in forums online do that when talking about cheating husbands. There are women who consider it a part of life and don’t really seem to care. Many men like that are often abusive and controlling. I think it’s a remnant of when people were regarded as property. Men had wives in history as they do cars today, purely for status. I don’t think men have a hardwired need to stray at all, no more so than women. There are exceptions on both sides, but for the most part the two are very much alike.

            I LOVED Vincent Price’s recitation of Poe. I have the DVDs…lol. Well, I think I loved most of the Poe movies he starred in. I’m a huge fan. I think he was excellent. If ever there was an actor suited for Poe’s material, it was Price. He had a tremendous voice. I don’t think there’s a movie of his I don’t like, at least until the late 60s. There’s some of the B movies I didn’t care for at all. They were beneath him. I didn’t like his “House on Haunted Hill,” but only because the main female screams from start to finish. It’s so aggravating. You can’t pay attention to much else and any little noise or event seems to trigger the screaming all over again. Otherwise, he was excellent in it.

            I’ll check out your blog. I love new sources. I already have one article up that relates to the Titanic. You might’ve seen it already, but just in case: https://appalachiangothic.com/2012/09/frank-lucky-tower/

  1. Sorry I am posting this in the main string. Your last post had no “reply” function on it. It shouldn’t make any difference, however.

    >>Hi! No, I’ve not had a chance to visit the links, but am hoping to asap.<>I LOVED Vincent Price’s recitation of Poe. I have the DVDslol. Well, I think I loved most of the Poe movies he starred in. I’m a huge fan. I think he was excellent. If ever there was an actor suited for Poe’s material, it was Price. He had a tremendous voice. I don’t think there’s a movie of his I don’t like, at least until the late 60s. There’s some of the B movies I didn’t care for at all. They were beneath him. I didn’t like his “House on Haunted Hill,” but only because the main female screams from start to finish. It’s so aggravating. You can’t pay attention to much else and any little noise or event seems to trigger the screaming all over again. Otherwise, he was excellent in it.<>I’ll check out your blog. I love new sources. I already have one article up that relates to the Titanic. You might’ve seen it already, but just in case: https://appalachiangothic.com/2012/09/frank-lucky-tower/<&lt;

    Thank you for following my blog. Are there any posts that stand out to you in any particular way?

    Yes, I have read the post on the Titanic–more than once. The story on Frank Tower is fascinating. What a mystery!

    Oh, by the way, the ship hit the iceberg 11:40 p.m. the evening of Sunday the 14th but sank on the morning of Monday the 15th. Just an observation, sorry. In all other regards, very well done. 🙂

    As for me, I have a number of possible premises I am juggling for an article, including the premonition of Eva Hart's mother. Other passengers had ill feelings about that ship as well, so this story, or collection of stories, warrants attention. There is also Morgan's book, "The Titan." The similarities are uncanny.

    Again, if you have any suggestions or recommendations for an article premise you'd like to see in 'Appalachia,' please let me know.

    1. Oh geez,

      Apparently, some parts of the above post were inadvertently removed. Sorry. I will include them here and in a coherent fashion:

      >>Hi! No, I’ve not had a chance to visit the links, but am hoping to asap.<>I LOVED Vincent Price’s recitation of Poe. I have the DVDslol. Well, I think I loved most of the Poe movies he starred in. I’m a huge fan. I think he was excellent. If ever there was an actor suited for Poe’s material, it was Price. He had a tremendous voice. I don’t think there’s a movie of his I don’t like, at least until the late 60s. There’s some of the B movies I didn’t care for at all. They were beneath him. I didn’t like his “House on Haunted Hill,” but only because the main female screams from start to finish. It’s so aggravating. You can’t pay attention to much else and any little noise or event seems to trigger the screaming all over again. Otherwise, he was excellent in it.<>I’ll check out your blog. I love new sources. I already have one article up that relates to the Titanic. You might’ve seen it already, but just in case: https://appalachiangothic.com/2012/09/frank-lucky-tower/<&lt;

      Thank you for following my blog. Are there any posts that stand out to you in any particular way?

      .Yes, I have read the post on the Titanic–more than once. The story on Frank Tower is fascinating. What a mystery!

      Oh, by the way, the ship hit the iceberg 11:40 p.m. the evening of Sunday the 14th but sank on the morning of Monday the 15th. Just an observation, sorry. In all other regards, very well done. 🙂

      As for me, I have a number of possible premises I am juggling for an article, including the premonition of Eva Hart's mother. Other passengers had ill feelings about that ship as well, so this story, or collection of stories, warrants attention. There is also Morgan's book, "The Titan." The similarities are uncanny.

      Again, if you have any suggestions or recommendations for an article premise you'd like to see in 'Appalachia,' please let me know.

      Sorry for the mess up. I hope it didn't cause any confusion. This one shows each subject properly and clearly divided. Perhaps you can delete the post above to avoid any further confusion among the readers.

      1. Hi! My host is doing some server upgrades this week, so the site may be buggy. Sorry. I have an old .pdf I found on Google Books called “The Cabinet of Curiosities.” I found the information on Hugh Williams in it. It’s an encyclopedia-sized book filled with old European goodies. There are a few mentions on events in America, but it’s a very old book.

        That was a toughie as for the Titanic. Many accounts use either of the dates.

        From what I found so far, The Titan author died from grief. He felt somehow responsible. I also know the Vanderbilts, of Biltmore, were set to return to America aboard the Titanic. They were on vacation in Europe. They changed their minds at the last minute.

        BTW, do you have my email address? I just changed internet providers so none of my hughes.net addresses will work. Now, I just use administrator@appalachiangothic.com. I know it’s sudden, but I didn’t think we’d get it installed so quickly! We went from satellite to cable internet.

        If you like horror movies, you might also like the 1999 House on Haunted Hill. I loved it, believe it or not. I don’t usually like remakes. Geoffry Rush is the leading male, and he attempted to look like Edgar Winters, but he actually looks more like Vincent Price. That’s why his name in the film is Price. I know a lot of people didn’t like it, but I really did. I saw it as really an entirely different movie from the first. About the only thing that’s the same is a group of people somehow get drawn in to spending the night in a creepy old hospital, in celebration of Price’s wife’s birthday.

        I wish Price had been allowed to do more. They labelled him as a Communist in the 1950s and it destroyed his career. It’s so sad. I grew up thinking he was a theater actor from England…lol. I was stunned to learn he was just from Oklahoma.

        1. Well, okay. I hope this pans out. If not, you’ll know why.

          Yes, I got that email, but I will use the administrator one you provided above, that is until you get the new one established.

          “The Cabinet of Curiosities” sounds like a mystery in itself. I will look for it. I am sure it contains some rare gems.

          The strange thing regarding Robertson’s book is that the story closely mirrored the Titanic and her tragedy. That was the eerie part and why many believe the book to be a prophesy. This could be the reason why the author felt responsible–he somehow say it coming and either couldn’t or didn’t try to prevent it. The thing was, he likely didn’t know at the time of writing it would come true, so he felt helpless when time came to pass and the story became real. Then again, the similarities between his book and the actual tragedy left him speechless, just as the latter had with J. Bruce Ismay. This story has the potential for a book in itself. Questions abound here as well.

          As for the Vanderbilts, the stories about their last-minute cancellation revolved around ill feelings on their part, but the debate hoes on. Others claim the cancelled for other reasons, such as taking a later boat home. Imagine their reaction to the news about Titanic.

          As for me, I have two angles here–the Robertson novel and those who had ill feelings regarding the Titanic’s maiden voyage. Both are extremely intriguing to me.

          Yes, I have seen that version. In fact, I own the DVD and am about to play it now. I like it as well. The director said that Geoffrey Rush’s resemblance to Vincent Price was merely a coincidence. Wow, some coincidence.No doubt that resemblance played a nostalgic role in the film’s success, at least with those who had seen the earlier Price version. Imagine if Vincent Price had lived long enough to see it. No doubt he would have been offered a role. I wonder which role would that have been–Dr. Vannegut, perhaps?

          I didn’t know that about Vincent Price. It couldn’t have affected him, though, because he went on to star in hundreds of pictures after that and became a legend as a result (unless you are referring to what he COULD have become). I originally thought him British as well, but I was shocked to read he had hailed from Missouri (where did you hear Oklahoma?), hmm. I think he lived in England for a time, though. He also became a gourmet chef in his later years and published books on the subject. I wonder what kind of person he was like.

          1. There were several works that came into discussion after the sinking, although I can’t recall them off the top of my head. There was a long poem published in the 1870s, I believe, that they tied in with the sinking. The poet was a female, but she died around 1896, so she never knew about it.

            I’d say had Price lived, he might’ve only done a cameo in the new HOHH. He was becoming feeble before he died. You could really tell it in Edward Scissorhands. Was it Missouri? It’s been so long since I watched the biography on him, I’m not sure who made it. That’s probably right, though. You have to be careful with those. I’ve seen several on Vivian Leigh that were pretty out there and unfounded.

            I was thinking of what he could’ve been. He had such presence onscreen and such a commanding voice. Jim Varney (Earnest P. Worrell) was kind of like that. He did well with his Earnest character, but he was classically trained. He always wanted to do Hamlet. I always believed Price would’ve probably been a very genteel cut-up. Most people who do great villains are just the opposite in real life. One funny contrast, do you remember the original Highlander movie? Sean Connery was in it. The bad guy, Kurgan (Clancy Brown), is Mr. Krabs on Spongebob Squarepants today. I laughed when I found that out, the movie has never been the same since.

          2. Are you sure it wasn’t Emily Dickinson? Her poetry dominated the late-nineteenth century, and much of it was long. I have heard much literature connected with the Titanic legend, either directly or indirectly, through association and interpretative theory. That certainly added depth and dimension to the story, but not always providing truth or substantiating facts.

            That doesn’t mean such works and their implications weren’t or aren’t interesting in their own right, however. If I find more on that, I certainly will let you know. You can certainly visit and join http://www.enxyxlopedia-titanica.org . I am certainly the website will likely have information on that. In fact, the subject matter may even categorically warrant its own section there.

            Yes, I know Price had grown feeble within the last years of his life, but he would have made an interesting Fr. Vannegut were he strong enough to take the role. I presumed a cameo as well, maybe Stephen Price’s father. The ‘what-id’ factor is interesting to consider, though it doesn’t really mean anything at this point. Had Price appeared in the remake, however, the movie would have had much more significance as a cult film and a tighter connection with the original movie beyond basic plot-line and title.Apparently, a sequel was made to 1999 version with Jeffery Combs reprising his role as Vannegut, but I haven’t seen it.

            Genteel cut-up? Yes, I could see that with Price. I was curious how he was with the public, his fans. I haven’t read and personal accounts from people who have met him, so I really don’t know. Did he believe in a spirit world and hauntings?

            Yes, many documentaries are slanted to a particular bias. I even addressed that point in a post at Researrcherone some time ago. Viewers should be careful and seek supporting data.

            I remember seeing Highlander, but I don’t recall Clancy Brown in it. Of course, that was a while ago. I do remembe Clancy in other movies, such as “Shawshank Redemption,” which I have on DVD. He’s always a wonderful bad guy. As you pointed out, he’s likely different in real life. In Sponge Bob? Oh man, LOL.That’s the last place I’d expect to see him, which may explain why he was in it. That shows a new dimension to him as an actor, just as did Jim Varney’s classical training did for him. It’s hard to see that in an actor known most for playing a hick, though, at the same time, I am not surprised in the least, since anything and everything is possible with actors.

            Again, I had to reply to my own message above, but this is in response to your last post.

          3. That’s fine.

            No, it wasn’t Dickenson. The writer was relatively obscure, her poem was called “The Tryst,” I believe. Wait, here it is:

            http://www.seacoastnh.com/poems/tryst.html

            I knew it was somewhere online.

            Clancey was really made up in Highlander, he started the movie with long black hair and ended it with a shaved head. I usually call that “Lestat-ed” because of Tom Cruise’s transformation to Lestat. I know that’s nowhere near a professional or technical term, but it works. There isn’t much they can’t do with makeup today.

            As far as I’ve heard, Price was just an all-around normal guy off screen. Good-natured. He was into art and very intelligent, which likely goes without saying. I’ve never came across anything derogatory about him. I don’t know what his personal feelings were on the paranormal. I’ll have to look into that sometime. That would be interesting.

  2. This came out the same as the first one, hmm. Let’s try something else:

    >>I LOVED Vincent Price’s recitation of Poe. I have the DVDslol. Well, I think I loved most of the Poe movies he starred in. I’m a huge fan. I think he was excellent. If ever there was an actor suited for Poe’s material, it was Price. He had a tremendous voice. I don’t think there’s a movie of his I don’t like, at least until the late 60s. There’s some of the B movies I didn’t care for at all. They were beneath him. I didn’t like his “House on Haunted Hill,” but only because the main female screams from start to finish. It’s so aggravating. You can’t pay attention to much else and any little noise or event seems to trigger the screaming all over again. Otherwise, he was excellent in it.<<

    So do I! I particularly like his work towards EAP and even Nathaniel Hawthorne.I have read Price was considered a Poe expert. If this is true, I am not surprised, since his performances reflect a deeper and more profound insight into the writer's work. It's hard to think of Edgar Allan Poe without Vincent Price, at least in the movies. That's not to negate John Cusack's recent performance.

    I currently have seven Price movies, including his version of "HOHH." Among the others: "Pit and the Pendulum," 'The Raven' and "Masque of the Red Death." I want to get "The Fall of the House of Usher," The Oblong Box" and others based on Poe's work, as I am collecting them. As for "HOHH," I see the two versions different,, which is how they are supposed to be viewed.Yes, the over-scream weakens the dramatic effect to the point where you can't take it seriously, so I am with you on that one. Yes, Price carried the movie. I am not particularly into all of his work, but I never turn down a chance to view a movie of his, just to see him. I think he will be forever known for the EAP movies.

    1. No certain about the system, but it keeps cutting out parts of my post(s). I hope this works. In any case, you can get of my responses to the various subjects by reading through them all.

      >>Hi! No, I’ve not had a chance to visit the links, but am hoping to asap.<<

      Okay, Share your thoughts on them when you have the chance. I am curious about your impression on them.

  3. Oh, Celia Thaxter. Yes, I have heard of her. Thanks for sharing.The poem is quite haunting and penetrating.

    The body of predictive accounts alone is an intriguing part of the Titanic legacy. I have at least one book dedicated to the subje3ct.titled “A Treasury of Titanic Tales” by Webb Garrison, although some skeptics have criticized the book.I have only read parts of it as time provides due to time constraints.

    Yes, I recall Clancy now. The long hair is reminiscent to Le Stat in “Interview with the Vampire,” which I also have on DVD. There is something about both long hair and baldness in historical pieces that rings authentic as well as striking as a way to bring out and/or emphasize a character.

    I figured Price would have been as you described. I haven’t read any personal account on his real-life disposition from anyone else, which is why I asked. The nature and degree of his intelligence emerges quite clearly through the profundity of his performances and continue to be impressed. As for his stance regarding the paranormal, I found a little on that, but not enough to form a statement on that. I will look into again and develop something coherent to share. Curious minds (like yours and mine) want to know, LOL.

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